Aerial view of damage from Hurricane Sandy

ACSF Faculty Fellow Charles Greene (EAS) describes Hurricane Sandy, which hit the East Coast hard earlier this week, as a “monster hybrid storm 

Beyond the Perfect Storm

November 1, 2012

Aerial view of damage from Hurricane Sandy

ACSF Faculty Fellow Charles Greene (EAS) describes Hurricane Sandy, which hit the East Coast hard earlier this week, as a “monster hybrid storm that combines the worst features of a late-season hurricane and an early-winter nor’easter.”

Chuck Greene Prof. Chuck Greene (EAS)

He explains why the “climate system is now predisposed to favor the development of such unusual storms both this week and in the future” in a blog entry for Scientific American.

Would this monster hybrid storm have emerged without the effects of global climate change? I don’t think we will ever be able to answer that question without some ambiguity. What I will say is that the climate system is now predisposed to favor the development of such unusual storms both this week and in the future.

(Read Charles Greene’s Scientific American blog entry.)

Greene is collaborating with several other ACSF fellows as part of a consortium working to develop integrated technological solutions to problems in climate, energy, food, and water sustainability. The consortium will display some of these technologies in the Sahara Forest Project demonstration facility at the United Nations’ COP18 meeting later this month in Doha, Qatar. Cornell’s portion of the project was launched with AVF support and is now funded by major grants from the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Yara International.

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On November 11, Greene also shared a comment on Andy Revkin’s DotEarth post, “Will Storm’s Wall Street Impact Influence U.S. Carbon Policy?