Globe showing extent of ice in arctic

The December 2012 edition of Scientific American features "The Winters of Our Discontent" written by Atkinson Center Faculty Fellow, Charles Greene (EAS) 

Charles Greene: The Winters of Our Discontent

November 26, 2012

Globe showing extent of ice in arctic

The December 2012 edition of Scientific American features "The Winters of Our Discontent" written by Atkinson Center Faculty Fellow, Charles Greene (EAS):

Chuck Greene Prof. Chuck Greene (EAS)

The past three winters in parts of North America and Europe were unusual. First, during the winters of 2009–2011, the eastern seaboard of the U.S. and western and northern Europe endured a series of exceptionally cold and snowy storms—including the February 2010 “snowmageddon” storm in Washington, D.C., that shut down the federal government for nearly a week. Later that year, in October, the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) forecasted a mild 2010–2011 winter for the eastern U.S., based on a La Niña pattern of cooler than usual ocean temperatures in the eastern Pacific. But even with La Niña’s moderating effects, very low temperatures and record snowfalls hit New York City and Philadelphia in January 2011, catching the CPC and other forecasters by surprise.

In Brief

  • Global warming has increased the loss of summer sea ice in the Arctic, which has altered atmospheric conditions that influence winter weather in the U.S. and Europe.
  • The changes lead to invasions of Arctic air into the middle latitudes, increasing the likelihood of severe winter outbreaks, which occurred in the eastern U.S. and northern Europe in 2010 and 2011 and in eastern Europe in January 2012.
  • The deck may be stacked for harsh outbreaks during the 2012–2013 winter in North America and Europe.

The full article is available online, but requires a Scientific American subscription.