Mosquito

ACSF Faculty Fellow Laura Harrington (ENT) was the featured entomologist in a recent science story on the NBC News website 

Fewer Mosquitoes This Summer?

January 25, 2013

Mosquito

ACSF Faculty Fellow Laura Harrington (ENT) was the featured entomologist in a recent science story on the NBC News website. In “The Bright Side of This Winter’s Big Chill: Fewer Mosquitoes This Summer,” NBC News science blogger John Roach wrote:

Laura HarringtonLaura Harrington (ENT)

As the bitter cold in the northeastern United States keeps even hardy New Hampshire skiers off the slopes, there’s at least one potential upside to the cold snap: fewer mosquitoes come summer, according to an entomologist riding out the cold in upstate New York.

“Most arthropods have the ability to super-cool themselves in order to survive extreme cold winters in the ranges they’ve become adapted to. However, if unusually cold temperatures strike, it could be below their threshold of tolerance,” Cornell University’s Laura Harrington explained via email to NBC News.

Harrington noted that mosquitoes may evolve and adapt to overcome this effect. In fact, the mosquito population could ultimately increase, if cold snaps impact mosquito predators, including birds, bats, dragonflies, and frogs. “Until we have a better understanding of the complexities of climate change impacts on vectors,” Harrington said, “it is hard to predict.”

For upstate New York residents, however, even a brief reprieve from summer’s bugs would be welcome news!

Read John Roach’s article on NBCNews.com.