Lake Vida - one of the most remote lakes of Antarctica. Credit: NASA Ames/Chris McKay

Antarctica is one of the world's least hospitable environments. But under its frozen surface, the soil hides a unique ecosystem where microscopic worms called nematodes thrive 

Antarctic Nematodes and Climate Change

May 8, 2013

Lake Vida - one of the most remote lakes of Antarctica. Credit: NASA Ames/Chris McKay

Antarctica is one of the world's least hospitable environments. But under its frozen surface, the soil hides a unique ecosystem where microscopic worms called nematodes thrive. Soil scientist Diana Wall recently won the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement for her work on Antarctic nematodes. These tiny worms are helping scientists understand the effects of climate change.

David Wolfe (HORT)Prof. David Wolfe (HORT)

ACSF Faculty Fellow David Wolfe (HORT) praised Wall’s research: 

This is affecting our concept of where life can exist, expanding the notion that it’s very likely we can find habitable life on other planets. I and others have talked about the possibility that life on our planet may not have originated in some warm, murky, little pond as Darwin had once suggested, but actually in the deep earth where life was protected from asteroid bombardment and from adverse atmosphere.

The BBC report noted Wolfe’s $5 million U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grant for research under way at Cornell to slow climate change by helping farmers conserve carbon in the soil, a project launched with a 2009 AVF award from ACSF.

Read more in BBC’s online news magazine.