Gunnison Sage-Grouse

In a November op-ed in The Hill, conservation scientist Amanda Rodewald argues that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s recent controversial decision to list the Gunnison sage-grouse as threatened under the Endangered Species Act is the best middle path. 

Faculty Fellows in The Hill

December 10, 2014

Gunnison Sage-Grouse

In a November op-ed in The Hill, conservation scientist Amanda Rodewald argues that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s recent controversial decision to list the Gunnison sage-grouse as threatened under the Endangered Species Act is the best middle path. The threatened listing will protect the bird, while still recognizing the promise of ongoing grassroots conservation efforts. She writes:

Had the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service doubted the ability of voluntary efforts to contribute meaningfully to the recovery of the Gunnison sage-grouse, the bird would be listed as endangered, with few exemptions or special provisions. In the end, given the private-land realities of conservation for the Gunnison sage-grouse, coupled with the demonstrated goodwill and efforts by partners, this wise, partnership-friendly decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offers the best hope and way forward for preserving the future of this bird and its uniquely American habitat.

Rodewald’s piece is part of a monthly series supported by the Atkinson Center, written in alternating months by Rodewald and ACSF faculty director of environment Alex Travis. Travis’s most recent column reflects on sustainable markets and biodiversity.

Also visit Chuck Greene’s op-ed “Winning the War on Fossil Fuels,” out this week.

Read Rodewald’s op-ed in The Hill.

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