Map of Marcellus Shale

“Shale gas is not the solution to global climate change,” says Environmental Defense Fund president Fred Krupp, a member of ACSF’s External Advisory Board. “But it can help reduce the use of high-carbon coal in the United States—and perhaps in China, Europe, and elsewhere.” 

How to Make Fracking Safer for the Environment

April 25, 2014

Map of Marcellus Shale

“Shale gas is not the solution to global climate change,” says Environmental Defense Fund president Fred Krupp, a member of ACSF’s External Advisory Board. “But it can help reduce the use of high-carbon coal in the United States—and perhaps in China, Europe, and elsewhere.” That advantage could make it an important resource for the next 20 years, as we ramp up to renewable sources of zero-carbon energy.

In the May/June issue of Foreign Affairs, Krupp explains that shale gas development brings real environmental dangers—especially the release of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Yet the shale revolution is rolling on in many parts of the country. Krupp makes a pragmatic argument in favor of government and industry working together to deal with pressing environmental problems through state-level regulation, effective measures to minimize methane leakage, and voluntary environmental standards. Krupp concludes:

Working to reduce the emissions of pollutants that accelerate climate change is a project that industry leaders and environmentalists in the United States should be able to agree on. By forging unlikely alliances based on a mutual understanding of what is at stake, the environmental community and the oil and gas industry can create strong, sensible standards that reduce the risks of unconventional oil and gas development—and ensure that the economic windfall benefits the environment, too.

Read more.