20150427-Lynas-eggplant-600x298.jpg

In the mid-1990s, Mark Lynas ripped up genetically modified crops in field trials in England and helped start the anti-GMO movement. In 2013, he sent shock waves through environmental circles by publicly apologizing 

Standing Up for GMO Food

April 27, 2015

20150427-Lynas-eggplant-600x298.jpg

In the mid-1990s, Mark Lynas ripped up genetically modified crops in field trials in England and helped start the anti-GMO movement. In 2013, he sent shock waves through environmental circles by publicly apologizing for his role in “demonizing” biotechnology.

In an April op-ed in the New York Times, Lynas explains why he changed his mind:

After writing two books on the science of climate change, I decided I could no longer continue taking a pro-science position on global warming and an anti-science position on GMOs. There is an equivalent level of scientific consensus on both issues, I realized: that climate change is real and genetically modified foods are safe. I could not defend the expert consensus on one issue while opposing it on the other.

Now a Cornell Alliance for Science researcher, Lynas spoke at Cornell (video) on April 29, 2013, as part of the Atkinson Center’s Outside Voices speaker series. He argues that the scientific community is losing the communication battle over the safety of genetically modified foods. With growing climate change threats, it’s time for a “more informed conversation about what biotechnology can bring to food security and environmental protection.”

Read more in the New York Times.