20150206-Biochar-600x298.jpg

When the world’s most cited scientific journal, Nature, ran a news feature in January on the uses and benefits of carbon-rich biochar, Cornell crop and soil scientist Johannes Lehmann took top billing 

State-of-the-Art Soil

February 6, 2015

20150206-Biochar-600x298.jpg

When the world’s most cited scientific journal, Nature, ran a news feature in January on the uses and benefits of carbon-rich biochar, Cornell crop and soil scientist Johannes Lehmann took top billing as a featured expert.

Lehmann describes the soil enhancer’s “unique potential to mitigate some of the greatest soil-health constraints to crop productivity”—but cautions that all biochar is not created equal. Biochars made from rice straw, wood, or manure, for example, will each react differently in different soils. The article explains:

Part of the difficulty is that biochar can be produced from all kinds of biomass and at different temperatures and speeds, which leads to huge variation in the substance—and in results. ‘I always say we should not even use the singular for biochar,’ says Lehmann. ‘There are only biochars.’

Read more about biochar in Nature.