20150625-UglyTomatoes-600x298.jpg

“Ugly,” misshapen carrot or banana? No, thanks.

Americans like their food to be aesthetically pleasing or “pretty,” but where most people avoid deformed fruits and vegetables, Jordan Figueiredo sees an opportunity to reduce solid waste.  

Ugly Foods: Only the First Step

June 24, 2015

20150625-UglyTomatoes-600x298.jpg

“Ugly,” misshapen carrot or banana? No, thanks.

Americans like their food to be aesthetically pleasing or “pretty,” but where most people avoid deformed fruits and vegetables, Jordan Figueiredo sees an opportunity to reduce solid waste. When Figueiredo isn’t working as a solid waste specialist in California, he’s tweeting to more than 12,000 followers of @UglyFruitsandVegs and organizing events to showcase meals made from less-than-perfect foods. Figueiredo’s goal is for grocery stores to help reduce waste between farm and store by offering less-than-perfect produce at discount.

It’s a great idea and a potential step toward both food security and reduced waste, but faculty fellow and “food psychologist” Brian Wansink says initiatives like Figueiredo’s may not be enough to change long-established grocery store practices. “It’s not always consumer demand that ends up determining what stores sell,” Wansink said. Wansink was quoted in an online story on Figueiredo’s #DemandUgly campaign.

Read more on OZY.com.