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Research by ACSF Faculty Fellow Kim Weeden (SOC) reveals the wage premium for working long hours is on the rise.  

Wage Premium for Working Long Hours is Rising

December 9, 2013

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Research by ACSF Faculty Fellow Kim Weeden (SOC) reveals the wage premium for working long hours is on the rise.  From the 1980s through the mid-1990s, hourly wages were lower for those working more than 40 hours per week—but today, overwork pays. Workers clocking more than full-time earn more hourly with each additional hour they put in. According to Weeden:

20131207-Weeden-Overwork-600x298.jpgKim Weeden (SOC)

By the mid-1990s, overworkers received higher wages per hour compared to full-time workers with comparable levels of education, experience, and other attributes. By the end of the 2000s, overworkers earned about 6 percent more per hour than their full-time counterparts. This shift from wage penalty to wage premium implies that overworkers experienced a much sharper increase in their hourly wages than regular full-time workers.

The increasing rewards for overtime—especially among highly educated, skilled workers—are part of the reason that men still make more money than women, who may be less willing to work very long hours. The recently released study by Weeden and a colleague was the subject of an Inc. magazine article by Jessica Stillman, “Do Long Hours Really Pay?”

Read more in Inc.

Graham KerslickDr. Graham Kerslick